Turkey Recipes

Rosé and Sage Turkey 

 

Thanksgiving is almost here… Lets make it a great one!

Hosting a holiday meal, whether it be for five or twenty-five, needn’t be stressful.

Take a moment now to review the guest list, read through your recipes and shop for any items that you will need.

Rosé was the wine of the summer…so I have decided to carry it right into fall with this Rosé and Sage Roasted Turkey. Many of the items that are needed for this recipe can be purchased ahead. Take the time this weekend to do little bit of organizing and gathering.

 

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It’s Turkey Time!

Thanksgiving is on its way!

Time to start thinking about the star of the show…
This year The Butcher will once again bring you Fresh Turkeys from D’Artagnan. All Natural. No Hormones. No Antibiotics. Be sure to place your order early to avoid disappointment!

Take a minute to view the following videos for a few tips on preparing the Turkey. The full recipe for my Rosé and Sage Turkey will follow shortly.

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Did you just realize that Thanksgiving is next week?

I will include a video of the Butcher carving this turkey in my next post. A suggestion to keep your turkey moist would be to make two separate pans of gravy. One would be poured over the turkey slices as you put it on the serving platter. The other could be set on the table. This method will l keep your turkey moist as well as hot, as it is served.

I will include a video of the Butcher carving this turkey in my next post. A suggestion to keep your turkey moist would be to make two separate pans of gravy. One would be poured over the turkey slices as you put it on the serving platter. The other could be set on the table. This method will l keep your turkey moist as well as hot, as it is served.

Have you just finished the work week, taken a breathe….and then realized that Thanksgiving is next Thursday?

Yikes!

Hold on though….No worries… No Stress…We’ve got you covered!
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Maple Tarragon Glazed Turkey

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Give thanks for the family this Thanksgiving!

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Maple Tarragon Glazed Turkey

Roasting a large turkey need not be intimidating~ Follow the technique below and surprise the family this Thanksgiving with a fabulous and juicy Farm Raised, D’Artagnan Maple Tarragon Glazed Turkey!

There will be no leftovers ~

You will need a large heavy roasting pan. If you prefer to use an aluminum disposable pan be super careful lifting to and from the oven. Remove all hot liquid with a baster before lifting the pan from the oven.

The D’Artagnan Fresh Turkey that I roasted was sixteen and a half pounds. It roasted for three and a half hours at 375 degrees fahrenheit. Every oven is different so take that into consideration. You will also need 30-40 minutes of resting time after removing the bird from the oven. This will give you time to heat up your side dishes.

Be sure to place an order for this special turkey! 

~The Turkey can be prepped and placed in the fridge overnight to save time on Thanksgiving Day~

PRINTABLE INSTRUCTIONS CAN BE FOUND HERE Maple Tarragon Glazed Turkey

You will Need:
1 Fresh Turkey ( This recipe uses a 16 pound D’Artagnan Farm Raised Turkey)
1/2 cup turkey stock
One bottle of your favorite Pinot Grigio wine
1 cup of pure maple syrup
1 cup ( 2 sticks) of butter
8-10 fresh or dried figs quartered or chopped
6 carrots; peeled and halved lengthwise
2 lemons; quartered
2 green apples; quartered
Small bunch of fresh tarragon
Olive oil for drizzling

To make the gravy you will need:

Pan drippings (I ended up with four cups)
Cornstarch (several tablespoons)
It also helps to use a small sifter to add the cornstarch to the pan…this keeps the gravy from getting lumpy.

Have on hand….
Fresh cracked salt and pepper to season
Toothpicks
Kitchen string
Aluminum foil
A kitchen timer
Meat thermometer

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees fahrenheit.

Start by having all of your ingredients chopped and ready to go. This makes the entire process go much smoother and will eliminate unnecessary stress!

Line the bottom of the roasting pan with the halved carrots. This will act as a rack to lift the turkey off the bottom of the pan.

Give yourself enough counter space and an empty sink to start with. Remove the neck and small parts that have been tucked into the cavity of the bird. Line the sink with a piece of parchment or foil. Rinse the bird inside and out with cool running water. Season the underside of the bird before placing in the roaster pan breast side up.

Now you can add half cup (one stick) of cubed butter and chopped figs around the bottom of the pan. Add 1/2 cup of turkey stock to the bottom of the pan as well.

Squeeze the juice from the quartered lemons over the entire skin of the turkey. Put the squeezed lemons and the quartered green apples inside of the cavity of the turkey.

Drizzle the entire bird with olive oil and season well with salt and pepper. Sprinkle chopped tarragon onto the turkey and add several bunches in between the wings and the legs. I like to use toothpicks to secure the wings in place. You can tie the legs with kitchen string.

(At this point, the turkey can be covered and placed in the refrigerator overnight if you like!)

Otherwise, if you plan to roast the turkey right away~
Mix one cup of Pinot Grigio white wine with half a cup of melted butter. You will use this to baste the bird every thirty minutes during the cooking time.

In a separate bowl mix half cup of Pinot Grigio white wine with one cup of Pure Maple Syrup and set aside. This will be used for the glaze during the last half hour of roasting.

Place your turkey in the oven, uncovered, for thirty minutes. Rotate the pan in the oven and baste with 1/4 of the butter wine mixture ; roast for another thirty minutes. Repeat the basting with butter mixture every thirty minutes until you have reached three hours. (You can also rotate the pan every time you baste. If the turkey starts to get too crispy you can cover loosely with a piece of foil at the two hour mark.) After the turkey has roasted for three hours remove the foil and spoon the maple wine glaze over the entire bird. Roast, uncovered, for an additional half hour or until the meat thermometer registers 165 degrees fahrenheit.

Remove the hot juices from the bottom of the pan with a baster BEFORE you lift the pan out of the oven. Reserve these juices and chopped figs to make the gravy.

Set the pan on the counter covered loosely with foil. The turkey should rest thirty to forty minutes before carving.

Click through both galleries for step by step instructions. 

You will find a carving instruction video at the bottom of this post~

The trick to a beautiful gravy is actually just having a little bit of patience and a few special tools! Follow the gallery below for simple turkey gravy.

How to Carve Your Turkey!

Carving the Turkey will be simple if you follow these few essential tips!

** Be sure that your Turkey has “rested” about 20-30 minutes after it is removed from the oven.
** Using an electric knife, which can be purchased at the home store for about 15-30 dollars will make your life so much easier!
** Prepare enough hot gravy to keep the slices of turkey moist until it is served.
** Have a large enough platter on hand!

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Be sure to have a large enough platter on which to place the sliced Turkey.

If you plan to use a fancy platter for serving sliced turkey, be sure that it is large enough, or use two smaller ones. This one is 18 inches long by 14 inches wide and was the perfect size to fit the entire 19 pound turkey that the butcher sliced up!

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By having a rimmed platter with a little bit of a well, you can pour gravy between the turkey slices which will keep the meat juicy and moist.

It helps to use a large platter with a deep center. I prefer to pour hot gravy over and in between each slice of turkey as it is carved. This is a great way to keep the meat moist. No matter how juicy and tender the bird is, after it is carved the meat tends to dry out…This method seems to do the trick! If you are having company that prefers the meat without gravy, then keep a couple of slices on the side.

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It helps to have all of your tools on hand…the most essential tool here is the electric knife! If you don’t already have one be sure to pick one up !

Having all of your carving tools ready to go, will ensure that the process goes smoothly! The Butcher’s favorite tool when carving a roasted turkey is an electric knife. This will keep the slices smooth and even. Be sure to have a large enough cutting board with a towel placed underneath to prevent slipping and catch any extra juices. A large chefs knife and a small paring knife will also help to carve the breast meat off of the bone. It’s also helpful to have several pairs of cooking tongs on hand.
IMG_4013After you have spent so much time roasting the turkey to perfection… the task of carving can seem monumental! Don’t stress, the Butcher will show you exactly how to carve the bird to perfection.
Watch the how to video below, there are two parts:

If you haven’t seen the recipe for this Wine and Herb Roasted Turkey you can find it here http://randsmeatmarket.com/2014/11/12/white-wine-and-fresh-herb-roasted-turkey-recipe/

White Wine and Fresh Herb Roasted Turkey Recipe

 

( A NOTE ABOUT THIS RECIPE POST WHICH WE WROTE IN 2014! The Butcher has found that he prefers the D’Artagnan All Natural Turkey to the one that we used in this recipe…so R&S Meat Market will exclusively carry the All Natural No Hormone…No Antibiotic Fresh Turkey from D’Artagnan…the Recipe and other ingredients remain the same!)…Happy Cooking!

Even a seasoned cook and entertainer gets butterflies at the thought of roasting an entire Turkey. Every year, thoughts are that you will remember exactly what was done last year to make the bird taste so delicious…and of course, when it comes down to it, you are racing for the cookbook or searching online for last minute instructions.

In searching the web and looking over many recipes, my favorite, due to flavor and simplicity was this one from The Splended Table. I put my own spin on it but the original recipe can be found here http://www.splendidtable.org/recipes/wine-and-herb-basted-roast-turkey-white-wine-pan-gravy

Click through the gallery for step by step photo and instructions:
Detailed directions are listed below the gallery-

 

From the Butcher you will need to order:
One Fresh Bell & Evans All Natural Turkey

You will also need:
A large roasting pan
One or two bottles of dry white wine
2 lemons; halved
One large bunch of fresh parsley; chopped
Several stems of fresh sage, rosemary & thyme; chopped
2 shallots; skinned and halved
3 whole carrots; peeled
1-2 sticks of softened butter
Fresh ground salt and pepper
One 32 oz box of chicken stock
Meat thermometer
1-2 tablespoons of cornstarch to thicken gravy

Additional tools that will come in handy-
Kitchen twine
Turkey baster
Kitchen timer
Soup ladle with long handle
Sieve
Whisk

Plan to prepare the first several steps of this recipe the night before you roast the turkey. It helps with timing but also produces a delicious, crispy skin.

To prepare the Turkey:
Place a large pan or piece of parchment paper in the bottom of your sink. Remove the turkey from the wrapping and rinse with cool running water. On each end of the bird you will find a cavity. Reach inside each end and remove the innards. You can keep these to flavor your gravy or simply discard. Rinse inside these cavities as well.

Pat the turkey dry with paper towels and place breast side up, in your large roasting pan. Even though the Bell & Evans turkeys are already trussed, it would be helpful to add some kitchen twine around the legs. This will keep them secure during roasting.

Rub the halved lemons over the entire skin of the turkey making sure to get in between the wings. Next smear the softened butter over the skin, pressing it in as you go. Also add several pats of butter inside the cavities. Season the entire bird, inside and out with fresh ground salt and pepper. Place the halved lemons inside each cavity.

Next you will mix the chopped herbs together and press them over the entire skin of the turkey. Add your halved shallots and whole carrots to the bottom of the roasting pan. At this point you can loosely cover the turkey with foil and place in your refrigerator over night.

Roasting The Turkey:
Remove the turkey from your refrigerator one hour before you plan to place it in the oven. This will allow the bird to come to room temperature and assure for accurate and even roasting.

Plan for enough time. You will need 4-5 hours to roast the above sized turkey, as well as resting time of about 20-30 minutes, and carving time which can also take about 20 minutes.

Pre-heat your oven to 375 degrees fahrenheit.

Pour 1/2 cup of white wine and 1/4 cup of chicken stock over the turkey. Place your turkey, uncovered into the oven and set your timer for 30 minutes. Baste the turkey with 1/2 cup of white wine and 1/4 cup of chicken stock every 30 minutes. Plan to rotate the pan every hour to ensure an evenly roasted turkey. About an hour and a half into the roasting time, you may need to cover the bird loosely with foil to prevent too much browning. Keep an eye on the time, and start checking the internal temperature of the bird at 4 hours. To do this, insert the meat thermometer between the breast and the thigh. When the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees, remove the bird from the oven. Set the pan on the counter loosely covered with foil for 20-30 minutes. This will let the juices redistribute. In this time the turkey will also reach a temperature of 165 degrees. Now you can prepare your gravy!

For the Gravy:
Remove the Turkey to another pan or serving platter. Ladel or pour 2 1/4 cups of the pan juices through a sieve into a shallow sauté pan. I used 2 1/4 cups of drippings which produced exactly two cups of gravy. Bring the drippings to a boil, whisking gently. Add one tablespoon of cornstarch to the sieve and shake over the top of the boiling drippings. Whisk to produce a beautiful gravy that is lump free! Continue to whisk until the gravy is thickened. You may want to make two pans of this gravy. One for pouring over sliced turkey on the platter, and one for serving at the table.

 

(The reason I prepare two separate pans of gravy is that I find it difficult to thicken more than two cups of drippings at a time. It produces a really nice gravy when done in smaller quantities. )

In tomorrows post I will include a video of the Butcher carving this Turkey. Using an electric knife is so simple and will produce even slices.

For My Gluten Free Friends:
I used Kitchen Basics chicken stock which is gluten free, and cornstarch to thicken the gravy…so this turkey can be made … Gluten free!

Happy Roasting…and a Super Happy Thanksgiving!

If you’d like to see The Butcher demonstrate, how to carve the turkey… click this link

http://randsmeatmarket.com/2014/11/13/how-to-carve-your-turkey/

Herb Crusted Boneless Turkey Breast

Lately I have been “living” in the beautiful new cookbook, A Kitchen In France, written by Mimi Thorisson.
The recipes sound delicious and fresh and the photography of her farmhouse and the French countryside are just breathtaking. I’m learning that in French cooking, many fresh herbs and ingredients are used. Each recipe looks hearty and healthy. In France the Butcher and the Fishmonger are held in high regard, as they use their artistry to prepare items to be roasted, and sautéed.

Mimi prepares a whole roasted chicken with creme fresh and herbs…it looks absolutely delicious!

Here in the States, with Thanksgiving on its way, many of us will be preparing a fresh turkey.  For those who have never roasted an entire bird, it can sound overwhelming.

If roasting the whole bird makes you a little nervous, you could start by roasting this Herb Crusted Boneless Turkey Breast inspired by Mimi’s french roasted chicken. By starting with a turkey breast you will get the hang of  your oven’s temperature, and figure out  how to rely on the meat thermometer to test doneness. It’s easy to prepare, cook and carve, from start to finish!

This turkey breast could also be served alongside the whole turkey if you are having a large crowd that enjoys light meat. Continue reading

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